Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘high holy days’

 

So much to tell, so little time!

I am flying to the USofA today!  But I will be spending less than 35 hours of it (cumulatively) on the contiguous 48.  That’s right.  My family and I are off to the gorgeous lush relaxing island of Kauai, the northernmost (and slightly less touristic) in Hawaii.  It’s hard to believe.  I’ve been working 18 hour days for a week now preparing for leaving, and now I’m leaving in about 10 hours, and I’m still working, and I haven’t started packing or cleaning or anything.  I’m going to end up on a beach, completely strung out after 2 days of endless flights, and not know how I friggin got there.  Oh well.  C’est la vie.  And I must say, I’m liking my vie very very much these days.  Now if I could only catch some more zzz’s and do better catching up on work and studies.  But I’m lucky.  Quite.

Some things to report:

The Golan Heights Winery stand being built at the Jerusalem Wine Fest

Last 2 days of the Jerusalem Wine Festival!  It’s at the Israel Museum tonight (17/8) and tomorrow (18/8) from 7pm-midnight.  You pay about 70 nis at the door, get a lovely Riedel glass (that you get to take home with you if you haven’t broken it yet), and drink endlessly from your choice of 30+ Israeli wineries.  With Jacob’s fresh cheeses and locally made gourmet chocolate also at hand, it’s a fun time.  I managed our stand the last two days, and all I have to say is GAMLA NEBBIOLO.  If you’re reading my blog, which hardly anyone does, but if you do, and you go, ASK FOR THE NEBBIOLO at the Golan Heights stand.  It’s under the counter.  And it’s incredible.

The Jewish High Holy Days are coming up.  If you like wine at all (and I’m assuming you do if you’re reading this), it’s the best time of year to taste almost every wine you’ve been curious about.  Pesach and Rosh Hashana are the biggest wine sales events – so the week before you’ll find free tastings at almost every wine store and supermarket in the country.  So go!  Explore!  Drink!  This is everyone’s chance to expand their horizons without having to leave their own neighborhoods.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Firefly's Kaylee enjoying an extremely rare delicacy

Until last year, I fasted on every Yom Kippur, the Jewish day of atonement, the most serious holy day of the year. I even read the Torah portion from Leviticus 19 for many, many years in synagogue.  Then last year, I found myself in Avignon, France, surrounded by the French, their art, culture, and of course, wine and cuisine.  I didn’t want to be a seeming “ascetic” while my friends and hosts luxuriated in their amazing market findings.  It could have been perceived as rude (I know that wouldn’t really be the case), or at best weird (more likely).  And I wanted to eat.  And I didn’t feel any deep down moral objection.  Even though I planned on fasting, and I brought a Machzor (a prayer book) with me, it didn’t feel wrong to eat.  No guilt.

Bouillabaisse: a signature dish in Provence

So this year, back in Israel, I’ve decided I want to eat again.  Not being abroad, though, this is a much bigger decision.  One that has to be justified.  Proved.  You’ve got to have a prepared, “I’m an atheist,” or, “I believe in the spirit of it all, but I’m not religious and don’t feel it necessary to deprive myself,” etc, etc, etc.  Many people, secular people, do fast…but they also don’t go to synagogue and they sit around in their AC and watch TV and movies all day.  Not too difficult.  Which is what fasting is more or less intended to be.  Not that fasting is torture.  I’ve been told many interpretations over the years on why we fast.  The most common is that we deprive the body of all luxury so it can focus on the task at hand, namely, repenting before god, apologizing for any and all sins committed, knowingly or unknowingly.

Opening heaven's gates

Another interesting explanation is that on this day we should act as though we are dead — not dead, dead, but that we are weakening ourselves, humbling ourselves before god, wearing white robes and no leather, humble clothes, like Jewish funeral shrouds — and in the States at my temple, at least, we ran a food drive.  People were encouraged to donate at least the equivalent of what they would have eaten in that day they fasted.  All of this so that we can ensure we’ll be written up in the book of life for another year — asking god to keep death away for another year.

I’m fine with food drives.  I champion food drives.  I’m fine with introspection, of analyzing my own behavior.  Improving myself.  And certainly, most certainly, apologizing to PEOPLE in my life for having offended or mistreated them.  But I don’t have a relationship with god.  I just don’t.  I also believe that good behavior comes from within, and if people do good deeds to look favorably in the eyes of god, they’re missing the intention of it all.  Guilt.  Shame.  Incentive.  I believe in goodness for its own sake because it is simply the right thing to do.

Women at the Western Wall

I am proud of being Jewish, but I don’t believe that I have to pray in a specified way because that’s the way it is.  I believe I am a good Jew, in my behavior, in the way I live my life.  I believe in holiness.  I think I have been a good emissary of my people (I have been the first Jew many people have ever met, and goodness knows I have saved our reputation on more than one occasion).  I just don’t attribute that to god.  Fasting can be an important method of introspection, whether religiously or more meditatively.  I think that I am skipping the fast this year because I have decided I do not need to fast when I am told.  That I MUST fast as a symbol of being Jewish.  That’s an Americanism.  Going to shul because that is the way to maintain community.

Not so in Israel where secular holidays are religious holidays, where eating matzah on Passover is a national tradition, like Americans eating turkey on Thanksgiving.  Many olim, immigrants to Israel, often observe that it’s easier to be a Jew here…and hence…they become more lazy than they ever were back home.  Everything’s in Hebrew, the biblical language.  Biblical references are thrown about like Shakespearian references would be in Western literature.  Everyone understands the holidays.  They structure our year.  Kids have a bible study class every year from the age of 6 until graduation, whether secular or religious.  But because of that, you don’t have to try so hard.  I’ve certainly succumbed to that.

Defeat: Arch of Titus with Menorah carried to Rome

On the other hand, living in Israel has freed me in many ways.  Before, I felt a duty to express my Judaism when living abroad.  I’m still a Jew, and I never hide this fact when traveling abroad.  It is an important part of what made me, me.  But my real deep-down beliefs have surfaced much more easily here.  Relaxing the Jewish fervor, not being in a minority group anymore, I am finally comfortable with expressing my dissatisfaction with certain aspects of Judaism.  I don’t have to put on a face, trying to “accept” interpretations to make my following of certain rituals logical to me.  I had been interested in different meditation techniques for years, but I believe that I avoided any sort of exploration because I thought it would be seen as disloyal.  So many Jews marry outside the faith, we’re disappearing, we’re forgetting — what responsibilities on our shoulders!  Keepers of the faith.  Keepers of our special nation.

No more.  For me, I am beginning to understand that it more important to be a good person than a good Jew.  These things are not contradictory, but at this point, I am finding that the Jewish definition is limiting.

Tomorrow, I am co-hosting a sci-fi marathon.  All 14 episodes of Firefly followed by the sequel film, Serenity.  Like the world of Star Trek, in many ways this brilliantly imagined series examines the human condition and celebrates compassion in the midst of a difficult, violent, and unjust world.  I’ll be making pizza from scratch.  I’m content with my decisions.

Read Full Post »

By Irene Sharon Hodes
Published in the Shiur Times Magazine, September 2008

On a recent trip to Tuscany, I visited a small family-owned vineyard. Surrounded by crusty breads and rustic cheeses, the smiling couple and their children shared their hard-earned creations: tart Chiantis, musky Grappas, and an inspired Vin Santo made from the most mature grapes of the season. But it was the dessert – a rare creamy white-blonde acacia honey – that I took home to Israel. Wandering the world, often desperately alone, all I thought at that moment was how perfect this particular honey would be months later on Rosh Hashana.

As a new olah finishing her first year here, and as a single woman rounding off the end of her 20s, I only now came to realize how important is the nature of structure. In our daily schedules, weekly traditions, foods, relationships, prayers, in the very execution of our lives, a solid structure is the plan, the roadmap. With it we are better able to achieve our milestones, experience our joys, and endure in times of hardship and sorrow. Without it, we are lost.

Having lived in seven countries, made and left dozens of friends, and changed careers, all too frequently, I have come to realize that living without structure is much like not having an identity. This continued absence has profoundly affected my quality of life since making aliyah, what I thought was fulfilling a lifelong dream.

Now that Rosh Hashana has arrived, my first here, the structure that is manifest in Jewish life has opened my eyes in a remarkable way. This is the time of year we take stock. When I did, I realized I overlooked another dream I had accomplished – graduating from culinary school. It’s been three months since graduation, and in the chaos of my unsettled life, I had forgotten how thrilling it was being in a professional kitchen every day.

Masquerading as vital sustenance, food is a physical manifestation of history, a deliciously important inheritance. Like a hidden code, the symbolism inherent in our recipes is a direct link to our ancestors. Bitter herbs at Pesach create a visceral connection to the hardships of our forefathers. Apples and honey at Rosh Hashana evoke the sincere prayers of our foremothers for a good and prosperous future, something we simultaneously pray for in tasting the sweetness.

As I ease myself into new concrete plans, I am strengthened by my Jewish heritage. For what else is tradition but a time tested standing structure? It is my hope that these recipes will inspire, sustain, revitalize, and sweeten your palate in envisioning the new year ahead. Me? I’ll be holding firm for the first time in a long time, savoring my “miele di acacia,” and with every drop, the memory of that perfect day, and the hope I had, even then, for a sweet new year.

Applesauce Cake

This first recipe came from Jamie Geller’s newest cookbook, Quick & Kosher, and it was a pleasant surprise. The book’s lackluster title (as well as the subtitle “Recipes From The Bride Who Knew Nothing”) made me more than a little skeptical, but after reading the introduction, I couldn’t put the book down. Don’t get me wrong – after years of delving into complex gourmet cuisine, it’s doubtful Quick & Kosher will become the foundation of my kitchen. But with its fun no-nonsense approach, it’s certainly a book I would give to my friends, and definitely to my own mother (for whom I have to thank for honing my culinary skills, growing up in the absence of hers). The clever Mrs. Geller devised a strict and ingenious guideline: preparations for every recipe must be able to be done in under 15 minutes. She cuts some corners (occasional soup powders, canned goods, and frozen items), but the recipes are quite innovative, simple to execute, and pleasing to modern palates. The selection ranges from the traditional (classic chicken soup, stuffed peppers, challah kugel), to the fresh and multicultural (hot salmon salad, beef sukiyaki with noodles, curried coconut couscous). Her desserts are particularly mouth-watering, and this applesauce cake would be a welcome centerpiece on any Rosh Hashana table.

3 cups flour

1½ cups sugar

2/3 cup canola oil

1 (12 ounce / 340 gram) jar applesauce

2 eggs

2 teaspoons cinnamon

1 tablespoon baking powder

1/8 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 teaspoons cinnamon sugar

½ cup non-dairy whipped topping

  • Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Lightly grease a 9 x 13-inch (23 x 33 cm) cake pan with non-stick baking spray.
  • In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine flour, sugar, oil, applesauce, eggs, cinnamon, baking powder, salt, and vanilla. Mix on medium speed until well combined, about 2 minutes.
  • Pour into prepared pan. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar.
  • Bake at 350° F (180° C) for 1 hour, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.
  • Serve warm or at room temperature with a dollop of non-dairy whipped topping.

Fusion Taboule

An old Middle Eastern mainstay with a thoroughly modern twist, my take on taboule looks back in time as it looks forward. Perfect for the holidays at hand: the sweetness of apples, pomegranates, and honey mingles with the invigorating cilantro and ginger, all resting upon the foundation of the hearty, humble quinoa. Replacing the traditional bulgur wheat, this ancient and nutritious South American grain has become so popular, almost every café in Israel is experimenting with it. The ingredients come from every corner of the globe, and the resulting combination is a sincerely satisfying culinary experience.

1 onion, finely chopped

1 cup pre-rinsed quinoa

2 cups water

Large handfuls (4-6 stalks) each, roughly chopped, of fresh:

Mint

Cilantro

Parsley

¼ cup raisins

3 stalks green onion, chopped finely

1 tablespoon fresh minced ginger

1 tablespoon fresh minced garlic

1 apple, cored and diced

Seeds of 1 pomegranate

½ cup olive oil

¼ cup lemon juice

¼ cup honey

salt and pepper to taste

  • Heat a small amount of olive oil in a saucepan and add the chopped onion. Cook 2-3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add quinoa and continue to stir 1-2 minutes or until onions sweat and quinoa browns slightly. Add the water and bring to a boil. Cover and reduce temperature, maintaining a simmer for 14-18 minutes. The quinoa is ready when the germ has unfurled to a tiny curl and has a slight bite to it (like al dente pasta). Set aside and cool.
  • While quinoa is cooling, prepare the dressing by whisking together the olive oil, lemon juice, honey, ginger, garlic, salt, and pepper.
  • Transfer cold quinoa to a large bowl and mix all other fruit and vegetable ingredients into it well. Add dressing and stir to coat the quinoa.
  • Adjust seasonings to taste by adding salt and pepper, a drizzle of olive oil, a spoon of honey. Serve and enjoy!

Note : This recipe is very versatile. Apples and pomegranates can be replaced by halved grapes, plums, melons, or grapefruits, depending on the season.

Click on the image to view the original article:

Read Full Post »